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Mandatory Minimum Car Insurance Coverage Amounts by State

Brandon Myers - Author Brandon Myers | Last Updated: June 27, 2021 |
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Buying car insurance can be a confusing process and one that involves a lot of calculation and numbers.  Thankfully car insurance is something we deal with often at DefensiveDriving.org.  It comes with the territory of all things safe driving.  Did you know that car insurance minimum coverage amounts vary by state?  It’s true.  Check out the helpful chart below to see what your local state jurisdiction requires as a minimum level of coverage to be driving on state motorways.

Minimum Car Insurance Coverage Amounts by State

The following are the minimum car insurance coverage amounts by state.  Each state has its own rules for insurance.  Make sure you’re paying attention here so the insurance you buy covers you to the level you need legally.

State Minimum Coverage Bodily Liability Bodily Liability > 1 Property Liability
Alabama 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
Alaska 50/100/25 $50,000 $100,000 $25,000
Arizona 15/30/10 $15,000 $30,000 $10,000
Arkansas 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
California 15/30/5 $15,000 $30,000 $5,000
Colorado 25/50/15 $25,000 $50,000 $15,000
Connecticut 20/40/10 $20,000 $40,000 $10,000
Delaware 15/30/10 $15,000 $30,000 $10,000
Florida 10/20/10 $10,000 $20,000 $10,000
Georgia 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
Hawaii 20/40/10 $20,000 $40,000 $10,000
Idaho 25/50/15 $25,000 $50,000 $15,000
Illinois 20/40/15 $20,000 $40,000 $15,000
Indiana 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
Iowa 20/40/15 $20,000 $40,000 $15,000
Kansas 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
Kentucky 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
Louisiana 15/30/25 $15,000 $30,000 $25,000
Maine 50/100/25 $50,000 $100,000 $25,000
Maryland 30/60/15 $30,000 $60,000 $15,000
Massachusetts 20/40/5 $20,000 $40,000 $5,000
Michigan 20/40/10 $20,000 $40,000 $10,000
Minnesota 30/60/10 $30,000 $60,000 $10,000
Mississippi 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
Missouri 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
Montana 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
Nebraska 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
Nevada 15/30/10 $15,000 $30,000 $10,000
New Hampshire 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
New Jersey 15/30/5 $15,000 $30,000 $5,000
New Mexico 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
New York 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
North Carolina 30/60/25 $30,000 $60,000 $25,000
North Dakota 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
Ohio 12.5/25/7.5 $12,500 $25,000 $7,500
Oklahoma 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
Oregon 25/50/20 $25,000 $50,000 $20,000
Pennsylvania 15/30/5 $15,000 $30,000 $5,000
Rhode Island 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
South Carolina 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
South Dakota 25/50/25 $25,000 $50,000 $25,000
Tennessee 25/50/15 $25,000 $50,000 $15,000
Texas 30/60/25 $30,000 $60,000 $25,000
Utah 25/65/15 $25,000 $65,000 $15,000
Vermont 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
Virginia 25/50/20 $25,000 $50,000 $20,000
Washington 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
Washington, D.C. 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
West Virginia 20/40/10 $20,000 $40,000 $10,000
Wisconsin 25/50/10 $25,000 $50,000 $10,000
Wyoming 25/50/20 $25,000 $50,000 $20,000

What do the numbers mean on an insurance policy?

The numbers on your auto insurance policy refer to the maximum limits you can be allotted on your liability insurance in the event you’re in a car accident or incident.

Bodily Injury Liability

Your Bodily Injury Liability is labeled on the first two numbers of your auto insurance.  This number represents the highest monetary amount your insurance company could settle for in the event of a car accident where someone is injured.  If you’re in a motorway accident and it is deemed your fault as the driver, your insurance company will pay for up to the first number for the person’s medical bills.  Anything over that threshold you will be personally liable for.  This is why it’s always a good idea to carry over the bare minimum when it comes to your auto insurance.

If you’re at fault for an accident where multiple people are hurt, the second number refers to the amount that your auto insurance would cover for all other parties after the first when it comes to medical bills.  If you are in a catastrophic incident where numerous parties are injured as part of something that is deemed your fault, the second number is the maximum amount your car insurance company will cover.  Everything over the amount you will be “out of pocket” for and personally liable for paying deemed the victim of the car accident.

Property Damage Liability

If your car is involved in a multi vehicle accident your Property Damage Liability, the third number on your auto insurance, is what would cover you.  That number is the maximum amount your auto insurance will pay for other cars and the damage they incur as part of a motor vehicle accident that is deemed your fault.  If the number of damage caused exceeds that of your coverage, you will be personally liable for paying that amount to the party deemed the victim of the car accident.

 

Brandon Myers
Brandon Myers is a Drivers Education and Safe Driving enthusiast. After a rollover vehicle crash and DUI, Myers has dedicated his life and career to the Drivers Education industry. Believing safe driving techniques save lives, Myers has spent over 5 years improving the industry with IDriveSafely, Aceable, and DriversEd.com.